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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
, california, michelle, fox news. >> the young pakistani girl, the taliban wanted dead has just taken a new step towards a full recovery. the latest on the teenager known by her first name around the world. and what doctors are doing to make her life a little bit more normal. and cats usually aren't too crazy about being in the water. so why is this guy swimming? swim, kitty. i alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choo any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...w
in a series of bombings in kirkuk. a pakistani girl shot by the taliban is speaking out for the first time since the attack that nearly killed her. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was shot in the head last october. that same month, she was airlifted to a hospital in britain. in a new video released today-- but taped last month-- she insisted she will go on advocating for the education of girls. >> i'm getting better day by day. it's just because of people. because all the people, men, women, children, all of them, all of them have prayed for me. because of these prayers, god has given me a second life. this is a new life. i want to serve the people. i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> sreenivasan: the teenager is expected to remain in britain for some time. newly installed secretary of state john kerry had his first day on the job today. the former senator entered the state department's harry truman building to a big crowd and loud cheers from staffers. he said he hopes to help make the world more prosperous and peaceful. wall street had its worst day of the year to date, amid n
. and soon, the awful odds became clear. these 53 americans were surrounded by more than 300 taliban fighters. what happened next has been described as one of the most intense battles of the entire war in afghanistan. the attackers had the advantage. the high ground, the mountains above. an they were unleashing everything they had. rocket propelled grenades. heavy machine. mort mortars. snipers taking aim. to those americans down below, the fire was coming in from every single direction. they'd never seen anything like it. with gun fire impacting all around him, clint raced to one of the bar racks and grabbed a machine gun. he took aim at one of the enemy machine teams and took it out. a rocket propelled grenade exploded, sending shrapnel in to his hip, his arm and his neck. but he kept fighting. disregarding his own wounds and tending to an injured comrade instead. then over the radio, came words no solder ever wants to hear. enemy in the wire. the taliban had penetrated the camp. they were taking over buildings. the combat was close,
were at a combat outpost near the pakistan border when 300 taliban fighters launched ambush. they were surrounded. the resulting 10 hour fire fight was one of the bloodiest of the afghan war. the soldiers caught in a difficult position with their base tea at the bottom of the valley and taliban controlling the higher ground. despite that sergeant was able to call in air support that killed 30 enemy fighters and even with a snap nell wound he risked his life to retrieve the bodies of the fallen around him. >> he and his team started charging as enemy fire poured down and they kept charging 50 meters, 80 meters, ultimately 100 meet run through a hail of bullets. they reached their fallen friends and they brought them home. >> this award is for the 8 soldiers who didn't make it. for the rest of the team that fought valiantly and imagine any if i sently that day. >> what a moment that was. retired staff sergeant the 80th living honor of recipient there was a light moment when his son first tried to climb the president's podium and made a mad dash for the chair where his dad was supposed to
was recognized yesterday for defending an american outpost from hundreds of taliban fighters. despite being wounded in battle, the soldier attacked enemies and also helped save many of his fellow troops. >> he lives the soldier's creed. i will never leave a falling comrade. so he and his team started charging as enemy fire poured down. and they kept charging, 50 meters, 80 meters, ultimately 100 meter run through a hail of bullets. they reached their fallen friends and they brought them home. there are many lessons from cop keating, one of them is that our troops should never, ever be put if a position where they have to defend the indefensible. but that's what these soldiers did for each other in sacrifice driven by pure luck. >>> all right. not to be outdone by his dad, his young son collin entertained the crowd before the ceremony. it was super cute. msnbc had that live. president obama said that little guy actually had also been racing around the oval office in advance of the ceremony. adorable. all right, as always, you can let us know why you're awake. shoot us an e-mail or tweet me a
of an all out attack by the taliban, the nation's newest medal of honor winner live in our studio. after this. or tall. it's not all about who sparkles the most. or who is the best dressed. what nature really cares about is what you have to offer. like the stevia plant. small and humble with a surprising secret to share... sweetness. truvia sweetener. zero-calorie sweetness, born from the stevia leaf. from nature, for sweetness. backflips and cartwheels.mile? love, warmth. here, try this. mmmm, ok! ching! i like the fact that there's lots of different tastes going on. mmmm! breakfast i'm very impressed. this is a great cereal! honey bunches of oats. i hear you crunching. otherworldly things. but there are some things i've never seen before. this ge jet engine can understand 5,000 data samples per second. which is good for business. because planes use less fuel, spend less time on the ground and more time in the air. suddenly, faraway places don't seem so...far away. ♪ you got yourself mcdonald's new fish mcbites. hit it! ♪ fish-ay! fish-ay! [ male announcer ] you can catch a lot with
organization. it belongs to no state. attacking states, laying low state government, defeating the taliban, al qaeda, making war in it will not stop it because terrorism like steanlt like markets are independenter in their character. what we have created beginning of the 21st century is a deep symmetry between the challenges we face and the political response the political institutions we have to respond to that. every challenge is interdependent global cross frontier and the primary political actors that respond are bounded, frontiered, independent nation states. and in that a symmetry, you can see the dysfunction of the modern world. we watch, for example, starting four or five years ago in copenhagen and going through mexico city and due by and recent meetings where 180 or 190 nations came together to renew the protocol already out of date in term of the ecological challenges but to embrace that now and failing to do so. and going home and saying that is because our sovereignty said china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to intern
. doctors in great britain plan to update the condition of the pakistani schoolgirl shot by the taliban after two big operations. malala was shot by the taliban because she wanted an education. surgeons in birmingham reconstructed her skull and restored her hearing in what may be her final two operations. good to see that she's doing better. >> remarkable young lady. that's for sure. >>> and the latest now on the fatal shooting of former navy s.e.a.l. and "american sniper" author chris kyle and his friend at a texas gun range. the suspect also an iraqi war vet apparently suffered from mental health issues and is now on suicide watch. with more on this here's abc's ryan owens. >> reporter: former navy s.e.a.l. sniper chris kyle was such a good shot he once hit a target more than a mile away. but police say it was a bullet fired at point blank range that ended the life of the husband and father of two. >> i'm a better husband and father than i was a killer. >> reporter: the 38-year-old died at a place he should have felt comfortable. this gun range southwest of dallas. and detectives say
. we went because it met our goal to give it about qaeda. we have been in the taliban government and set the country sorted into free play, we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them get it right. third, geostrategic plates in america in the world's interest to have a stable region. if afghanistan were unstable, acting pakistan's stability would be very tenuous and it challenges anyway, but i think it's important. my view is that we need to do is be persistent and consistent in the region. the reason people are so nervous is because in 2004 the inc. were going to leave and they seemed asleep before. in 1989 returned from the region. it doesn't matter whether each afghan style that appeared its become a commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989 and they're starting to think we're going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody they can rely on. they'll have other strategic allies. so what they looking for is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that the specific number of troops. i think it's the idea you got an ally somewhere in their
not for afghans. they didn't invite in 2001. it meant our goal to get rid of al qaeda. when we upped the taliban government and set the country in to free play, i think we developed a responsibility for helping them set it right. third, i think in america and the world's interest to have a stability region. if afghanistan were to be completely unstable, i think pakistan's stability would be very tenuous. and they have challenges anyway. i think it's important. so my view what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are nervous because in 2004, they think we're going leave and they have seen us leave before. in 1989 we turned from the region. it doesn't matter which each individual afghan saw that. it's become commonly accepted truth we left in 19 the 9 ab and they're walk in 2014. and they'll be nobody they can rely on. they don't have other strategic allies. what they're looking for, in my view, the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. i don't think that's a specific number of troops in a specific amount of money. ink it's the idea you
to get rid of al qaeda. but we appended the taliban government and set the country in the free plate i think we develop some kind of moral responsibility for helping them set it right. third dimaggio's strategically at think it is in america and the world's interest to have a stable region. if america were to be completely unstable i think that pakistan stability would be very tenuous and they have challenges in the way, but i think it is important so my view is what we need to do is be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave, and they have seen it happen before. in 1989 returned from the region. the intimate does not matter whether each individual afghan saw that, it has become commonly accepted truth that we left in 1989, and they're starting to think we're just going to walk in 2014 and there will be nobody that they can rely on. they do not have other judges to catalyze. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of all long-term should jiji partnership. i don't think that is
. it was to liberate because the plan was overthrow saddam, get out of there, just like we overthrew the taliban in afghanistan and god as they are and of course afghanistan fell apart and we had to go through that. we are facing an insurgency. we don't know what to do. all the officers there hadn't been trained to fight this sort of war. the listening manuals. they did what they usually do, banged on doors and arrest and kill people and anyone who had read kahlÚa or naco what now is counterproductive because you end up killing the wrong people. he off their cousins and brothers who may become insurgents, too. so petraeus in mozilla decides to put into effect the ideas he's learned. so he and his guys, they start setting up an election for the new district council. they said at the elections. they bring in field trip from turkey. they get communications systems going. they get iraqis to open up newspapers. he opens at the border to syria along northern iraq. he does all this on his own. he's not touring with coronation of anybody, washington or baghdad or any place that works for a while and th
and music was banned for years by the taliban. now with help from the state department, the world bank and other supporters, these young afghan children are enjoying a rare moment of harmony. 13-year-old leila zhari has been waiting two years for this moment, the chance to perform on the world stage, while breaking another taliban taboo, girls and boys playing music together. which do you like better, the drums or the trumpet? which is more fun? >> the drums. >> reporter: the drums? she's one of 48 young musicians who attend the only music school in afghanistan. where music was strictly banned under taliban rule. many in the group are orphaned by war. some even lived on the streets. today they're nearly 7,000 miles from home, bringing traditional sound from their homeland. the tambor, meksed with western harmonies they're also learning. organizers hope the young musicians can learn about america and america can learn about afghanistan. music is making a comeback. >> the future of afghanistan, where the children of the country are, the future and that hope is not dead. >> reporter: how
the medicine 2001. we met our goal to get rid of al qaeda. we have under the taliban government and set the country started into screenplay, we developed some more responsibility for helping him set a rate third, i think it's an america in the center a stable region. if afghanistan were completely unstable, who'd be very tenuous but it's important. we need to be consistent and persistent in the region. the reason people in afghanistan are so nervous is because in 2004 they think we're going to leave and 18 asleep before. in 1889, we turn from the region. it doesn't matter whether each individual afghans saw that, it's become commonly accepted truth they don't have other strategic allies. so what they're looking for in my view is the idea of a long-term strategic partnership. but i think that's a specific number of troops, even a specific amount of money. their fear is they are very far away. i was asking him this question. i said what you want in the future years quite homage to see what here? said a word about business and i'll be here taking money. because if you're making money here
to afghanistan shortly after the fall of the taliban. as you know, under the taliban government, little girls weren't allowed to go to school or taught to read and there are penalties for those in privacy and secret to teach them to read. i never been more proud of our government because one of the things the u.s. aid department did was set up reading programs for these little girls, many of them now 13-15, never in their life had a chance to read. i went into this room and it was very crowded and smelly because there was not much running water in afghanistan at the time and was very dirty but here these little girls were learning -- these young women were learning to read and i -- we talked with them through a translator and one of them told me one day when they learned to read, she wanted to write a book. i was at the time writing my book and i said well, is there something i could say on your behalf in my book until you get around to writing yours? and her answer through the translator was immediate. and she said, women should be free to go to work and to go to school and to choose their o
, it was after i made the address about three minute women and children in afghanistan by the taliban. and right after that i was here in austin visiting jenna at texas. we went shopping and the ladies -- who worked at cosmetic counter came up and said thank you for speaking for women in afghanistan. and i think i knew intepght julie that the first lady had a podium. i didn't really know it until after that. >> c-span new series plateds influence and image. the first of the kind project for television. examining the public and private lives of the women who served as first ladies. season one begins next monday. president's day at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. on c-span, c is c-span radio, and c-span.org. >>> next at the discussion on the u.s. and european economies. panelists discuss factors contributing to a weak u.s. economic recovery. unemployment, and federal reserve monetary policy. a representative from germany looked a the eurozone financial crisis. major challenges the european economy as well as the impact of environmental and industrial full employment and process perty. it's ninety m
. malala was shot in the head by the taliban last october in her native pakistan. she was oshot for her outspoken advocacy. >> today i can see that i'm alive. i can see you. i can see everyone. and today i can see that i'm getting better day by day. >> just an incredible young lady. she also announces the establishment of her new charity, the malala fund for girls' education. the message was recorded before malala's most recent surgery over the weekend, which the doctors have described as a success. >>> the president heads to minneapolis today to meet with local leaders on the issue of gun control. in his annual presuper bowl interview last night he addressed a range of other issues, including the risk of brain injury in children playing football. >> i want to make sure that we're doing everything we can to make the sport safer and that means that the game is probably going to evolve a little bit. >> president obama also addressed the boy scouts' longstanding policy of excluding gays and lesbians, saying that they should have, quote, access and opportunity the same way everyone else doe
stories to tell you about. the pakistani school girl shot in the head by the taliban is now recovering after her final surgery in england. doctors say she is in stable condition and is awake talking to staff and members of her family. the 15-year-old was attacked in october while standing up for equal education rights. >>> as the president gets ready to take his gun control plans on the road, the white house releasing this picture of him skeet shooting at camp david. the president looking to gain support for a ban on assault weapons. "fox news sunday" hosts chris wallace said it's another part of the president's proposal that has the best chance of passing. >>> some kind of expansion and possibly even a universal background check. you'd have to go through a background check to make sure that you didn't have a mental health history or a record o, a criminal record. >> the president will be in minneapolis tomorrow pushing his gun control policy. >>> and president obama making changes to his birth control mandate. now some religiously affiliated groups will be able to opt out. the white h
settlement with the taliban parts would that be useful? >> well, first of all i think the terrible bomb blast do underline what i think emphasized throughout the presentation is that terrorism remains one of the most serious threats we face, and this is one of the issues united states and india has worked on closely together. i'm not sure that it could be homegrown terrorism. we have had a number of tax which have been traced to inspiration outside the country i don't know yet. we will have to wait until the investigation reports are being completed. but counterterrorism certainly has attracted the attention of our government at the highest levels. we have developed a number of new mechanisms, both in terms of intelligence, in terms of the coordination between central government and the states because policing the estate subject. and, indeed, for instant checking and working out -- but like every other country, we are on the frontline of terrorism. we perhaps a little more than others, and we need to reinforce our efforts. and we will certainly be hoping to work very closely with our u.s. par
teenagers, generally want to stop at the time they're 30 and 20 taliban it's bad for them, you remind them of the fact that they couldn't control their own destiny so they get anxious, and what did they do? facebook. it's a coping mechanism. we get a large trial at colombia university sponsored by the nih. wanting as with which we can have depressed people in the trial. we had to cancel the trial but we couldn't find a single smoker who was not clinically depressed. the fundamental insight yet again is what to do to help these folks? i would argue that you take a couple different paths. one is show them what's happening. this is what a smoker's lung looks like. you can't hide from the. just look at the darn thing. at 11:00 you see that? as emphysema. the dark tar deposits is pretty evident as well from the cigarettes. and when you see that you have awareness and understanding why this matters to you. but the second insight you have, we offer is there certain times you can change people's minds. as a heart surgeon i don't have a lot of control of people who come in for surgery. i've done my
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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